Egg Tempera Forums

Go Back   Egg Tempera Forums > The Forums > Other Art Related Issues

Other Art Related Issues Discuss other art related issues not connected with tempera

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 19-12-03, 04:44 PM
Rosemary Rosemary is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Seattle, WA U.S.A.
Posts: 65
Default Cool description, I am printing and saving!

Thanks for the explicit detail! I think baker's parchment paper will work as a substitute for glassine. It might be in your supermarket.

I have glassine on hand as I have made prints in the past and they have not always dried as fast I would like. But the baking parchement paper seems very similiar, just heavier.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 20-12-03, 03:41 AM
hisstah hisstah is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 17
Send a message via AIM to hisstah
Default

Hi Rosemary! Thanks for your suggestion! It sounds like Baker's parchment would work very well.

Thanks very much for your input--it's often difficult to find an easily obtainable substitute for some of these incredibly expensive supplies. I'm going to see if I can find some for myself. :)

Take care!
XXXOOO
Lorraine
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 28-12-03, 05:44 PM
Camilla Camilla is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Denmark
Posts: 17
Default

Now I've tried on a piece of test canvas, and ... eh ... what can I say? Aligning the yarns is not that easy, but I also made a tear that was more violent that the one in the painting. So far so good. A little practise would help, I'm sure.
The blotting part turned out just as I feared. The glue stuck more to the blotter than to the canvas/the other threads, so each time I lifted the blotter the threads became all disorganised.
After it dried, I found that the canvas was glued to the glassine like paper. Great!
The japanese paper would rather stick to the blotter than to the canvas.
(Thank God I did this on a piece of test canvas!)

So, I don't really understand the use of blotter and glassine. Why not use an absolutely non absorbing, non adhering material like plastic (household wrapper?) instead of blotter and glassine? In this way the only things that can stick together would be the threads (step one) and the canvas and the paper (step two).

Camilla
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-01-04, 06:28 AM
hisstah hisstah is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 17
Send a message via AIM to hisstah
Default

The major reason for using blotter is to absorb excess moisture. Too much water will cause shrinkage of the canvas and flaking paint. If you use a non-absorbing paper, it will take forever for the mend to dry and you *never* want to allow moisture to sit on a painting that long. We rarely have a problem with the paper mend sticking to the glassine unless too much glue or water is used. It does take practice and I'm really glad that you tried it on a piece of scrap canvas first.

Try another mend, making sure that the paper patch is blotted a bit and not soaking wet when you apply it. You can always add a bit more glue after you've laid down the patch if you need to--just don't soak the canvas. Go ahead and put some plastic wrap on the front of your painting to avoid having it stick to the glassine--see if that works. Just keep changing the blotter on the back every few minutes. You can let it air dry a bit before applying the blotter if you like. Just keep a close eye on it and if you see any dimensional changes, quickly apply blotter and weights.

Again, the glassine is a smooth, clean surface that is ideal for laying your painting face down on--that's the major reason we use it. If it's clean, you don't have to worry about anything damaging the front of your painting.

Good luck. Sorry you're having so much trouble. When you're done, you'll be an expert!

XXXOOO
Lorraine
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-01-04, 01:06 PM
Camilla Camilla is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Denmark
Posts: 17
Default

Thanks, I'll try that. If it turns out that I'll have to use spackle, what kind should I use?

Camilla
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 29-01-04, 05:06 AM
hisstah hisstah is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Posts: 17
Send a message via AIM to hisstah
Default

Hi Camilla,

My apologies for taking so long to get back with you. We use Becker's Latexspackle where I work. You might have access to it where you live. But it can also be ordered from here: http://www.peregrinebrushesand2ls.co...texspakel.html

We used to make spackel by using a very fine calcium carbonate (gilder's whiting) mixed with gelatin--the same kind used in cooking. The type of gelatin we used came in thin, clear sheets. We used about 1/2 a sheet, crushed it into a small jar, added just enough water to cover the bits of gelatin and let it soak overnight. You can also microwave it for about 10-20 seconds at a time and let the gelatin slowly dissolve--but don't let it burn. When it's completely dissolved and slightly warm, add gilder's whiting to the gelatin until you get a stiff paste. If you want to use it for a while, you need to keep it refrigerated. You can see why it's just easier to use Becker's Latexspackel. :) There's more of a chance that the gelatin/whiting spackel will be less flexible in the long run. If you can get the Becker's, I'd use that.

Good luck!!
XXXOOO
Lorraine
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mould on canvas - help! Camilla The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues 4 11-01-07 05:57 PM
gesso on a oil prepared canvas?? sabine The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues 8 18-12-06 11:01 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:55 PM.
Design modifications, graphics and CSS by RobM
June 2010



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.