Egg Tempera Forums

Go Back   Egg Tempera Forums > The Forums > The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues

The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues Sharing the knowledge and experience of fellow tempera painters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 20-05-07, 12:09 AM
jeff's Avatar
jeff jeff is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 214
Default

That was my reasoning for using acetone to begin with. Perhaps mineral spirits is more appropriate since it isn't so vigorous in stripping off absolutely everything. Actually I was surprised that ET seems to be almost impervious to acetone though. As much pigment came off when I used oxgall as acetone.

jeff
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 21-05-07, 02:13 PM
David McKay David McKay is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 77
Default

I have read that acetone actually hardens protein which is why it is suggested as a cleaner for et. I have never used it. David
__________________
create what is in your heart and mind
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 30-05-07, 01:45 PM
jeff's Avatar
jeff jeff is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 214
Default

I've just got some feedback from my local conservator. She says that acetone creates microfissures in the ET surface that will create future problems for its longevity. It does this by causing some swelling of the paint film. She herself uses oxgall and has suggested that dry light rubbing with cloth might also have some effect on the surface without using either oxgall or solvents.

I have also dome some research and come across research on the swelling effect in the paint film caused by solvents (http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/waac/.../wn20-308.html). As one might expect not all solvents are alike in this regard. Solvents to be avoided are, for example, chlorinated hydrocarbons and turpentine. Actually the research suggested that perhaps acetone, methanol and ethanol may be quite moderate in their effects.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 31-05-07, 01:20 PM
jeff's Avatar
jeff jeff is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 214
Default

OK I think that I have it at last. This is what I did:
I wet the surface and then gently mopped up the water with a slight rubbing action using some muslin. I then used a few drops of oxgall in a concentrated medium of egg yolk and water to apply a "nourishing coat" to the picture.

It went on extremely well which more or less vindicates the proposition that the abrasion of the surface is crucial, perhaps more than any other factor. Solvents like acetone just make a process of chemical abrasion take place.

jeff
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cleaning an egg tempera surface David McKay On Paint and Pigments 9 02-08-03 11:04 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:30 PM.
Design modifications, graphics and CSS by RobM
June 2010



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.