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  #51  
Old 10-03-08, 04:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paintrman View Post
Thanks Douglas. Great website, by the way...
Thank you Kelly. I haven't updated the site in years nor put up any of my recent paintings. I want to have more color work when I do. I became frustrated with the lack of control in modeling I could achieve with the pure color glaze on grisaille technique but as soon as you start applying opaque oils you lose the charm of the tempera underpainting and the transparent "stained glass" look of the glazes. I have several tempera grisailles that I will return to, hopefully using traditional tempera color, but right now I'm trying to learn my chops with direct color in oil.

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Originally Posted by Thylacine View Post
... Liquin "... dries too darn fast and to a solid and highly impermeable film."
Duh, Those are precisely the qualities I'd hope for in a tempera isolation layer. Those are also the qualities that make it an excellent glazing medium.
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  #52  
Old 10-03-08, 08:10 AM
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Could I ask Danny, or any one else out there who might know:- Danny you said that varnishing a picture that has copal varnish used in the meduim is unnecessary, but if I wish to varnish it with matt varnish; would I still have to wait the usual 6 months to one year.
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  #53  
Old 10-03-08, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thylacine View Post
Kelly,
You only need a very thin isolation layer to prevent oil being sucked out of your glazes by the tempera.
(from the wfe). i'm wondering why it's a bad thing to have oil sucked out of your glazes into the tempera. it makes sense to me to have oil coating the little egg bits. if the objection is to the darkening of the paint, isn't that just how it works, and why painters always go back and put on highlights after the glazing?
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  #54  
Old 10-03-08, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul B View Post
Could I ask Danny, or any one else out there who might know:- Danny you said that varnishing a picture that has copal varnish used in the meduim is unnecessary, but if I wish to varnish it with matt varnish; would I still have to wait the usual 6 months to one year.
Paul, yes. This is because it's an oil in resin varnish. And you use it as a medium component in your paint. It all needs to cure.

I prefer to apply a final varnish, just for the extra protection against dirt and for cosmetic reasons, like you said, a matt to satin look.

Last edited by Danny; 10-03-08 at 07:31 PM.
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  #55  
Old 10-03-08, 10:04 PM
dbclemons dbclemons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim View Post
(from the wfe). i'm wondering why it's a bad thing to have oil sucked out of your glazes into the tempera...
The oil is the binder for the pigment. You would lose adhesion.
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  #56  
Old 11-03-08, 12:03 AM
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Not only that but without the isolating layer, I notice that my perfectly smooth backgrounds/skies look blotchy! In Koo's book, she mentions people that don't use an isolating layer but her theory is that they don't need one because their original gesso is a hard gesso as opposed to the softer one I must be using.
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  #57  
Old 11-03-08, 06:30 AM
Paul B Paul B is offline
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Thanks Danny.
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  #58  
Old 12-03-08, 06:30 PM
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Rather than forming a thin surface film like resins, oil soaks into the tempera and underlying ground. Isolation would not be achieved until the tempera was saturated. Any darkening of the oil would show. Darkening is kept at bay in pure oil paint by grinding to get the pigment/oil ratio as high as possible. Soaking tempera in oil would constitute a low ratio indeed. Besides, an oil isolation would have to thoroughly cure (months) before oil glazing could begin, especially if oil/resin glazing mediums are used.

In a discussion on another forum about the uses of alkyd paint, Dave Corcoran posted the link to this painter. http://www.robertbdance.com/alkydvisual.html Robert discusses the advantages of using alkyd as a glazing medium.
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