Egg Tempera Forums

Go Back   Egg Tempera Forums > The Forums > The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues

The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues Sharing the knowledge and experience of fellow tempera painters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-04-08, 08:55 PM
jpohl's Avatar
jpohl jpohl is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NWT, Canada
Posts: 246
Default About Daniel V. Thompson's book

Thought I'd start a thread with questions arising from Thompson's book...

The last time I read it through was shortly after my first baby was born, and just rereading a passage while my one year old was attempting to climb over me and pull my hair.. but I will prevail and piece knowledge together.

After reading the section on palettes and brushes I realized I should order more... Thompson recommends at least two dozen architect nesting cups... and to have a supply of three dozen brushes on hand... (although as my time is limited right now, perhaps I can make do and build on my supply as things progress...) he even said to throw out brushes with stray hairs (which I would think would be good for mixing...)

but the thing that surprised me, and I had overlooked was the mention of round bristle brushes... in the thread on "best brushes" for tempera people mention Rosemary and Co., Raphael, series 7 W&N, Rhapsody, Da Vinci, Escoda.... round kolinsky's and synthetic flats... I even turned up the suggestion for a large filbert (cat's tongue) in a search.. but no body has mentioned working with a round bristle...

Thompson recommends round bristles of highest quality and up to two inches long... but not the kind used for oil...

Does anyone use a brush like this? (I can see the importance perhaps with egg/wax) but with pure egg tempera... what would be it's main use? Has this changed with the development of new brushes?

What would be the highest quality round bristle brush for egg tempera these days?

I loved the Grumbacher Gainsboroughs for oil, but not sure how this would function in tempera...

Last edited by jpohl; 12-04-08 at 08:59 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 13-04-08, 01:02 PM
PhilS's Avatar
PhilS PhilS is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Sargentville, Maine
Posts: 222
Default

Jpohl,
With all due respect to Mr. Thompson, he was an educator- I don't believe he actually painted a whole lot in tempera. At least I've never seen any paintings by him... He makes blanket statements like: egg tempera is totally unsuitable for natural subjects(?) that make me a little skeptical about some of his information. Don't get me wrong- his discussion of Cennini's techniques are probably accurate. It's just his comments about painting that make me shake my head. You don't need 2 dozen mixing bowls (8 has been plenty for me) or 3 dozen brushes. I buy maybe 5 or 6 kolinsky sable brushes a year.
It's a great little book, but read it with a healthy dose of skepticism!
Phil
p.s. I can't imagine the use for a large bristle brush. Maybe someone else can enlighten us all on that one...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 13-04-08, 01:11 PM
Salamander's Avatar
Salamander Salamander is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 340
Default

Mayer's book is similar in that you need to take it all with a bit or so of salt ...( Mayer was a compiler of hearsay, not an artist himself).
That large bristle brush would give a nice streaky effect on a large work. Maybe in some preliminary layers.
e-in-o
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 13-04-08, 05:48 PM
RobM's Avatar
RobM RobM is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Nottingham, England
Posts: 350
Default

Makes a great shaving brush as well.........but that is hearsay!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 14-04-08, 08:13 AM
jpohl's Avatar
jpohl jpohl is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NWT, Canada
Posts: 246
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilS View Post
Jpohl,
With all due respect to Mr. Thompson, he was an educator- I don't believe he actually painted a whole lot in tempera. At least I've never seen any paintings by him... He makes blanket statements like: egg tempera is totally unsuitable for natural subjects(?) that make me a little skeptical about some of his information. Don't get me wrong- his discussion of Cennini's techniques are probably accurate. It's just his comments about painting that make me shake my head. You don't need 2 dozen mixing bowls (8 has been plenty for me) or 3 dozen brushes. I buy maybe 5 or 6 kolinsky sable brushes a year.
It's a great little book, but read it with a healthy dose of skepticism!
Phil
p.s. I can't imagine the use for a large bristle brush. Maybe someone else can enlighten us all on that one...
You're kidding.. well it looks like I have more money for pigments now. This is very good to know. I keep on learning...
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 14-04-08, 10:40 PM
Dennis H's Avatar
Dennis H Dennis H is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Auburn, AL, USA
Posts: 177
Default

Mayer has the proportions all wrong for slaking quicklime as well -- at least in the edition I own. While useful, his books are not infallible.
Jpohl, my advice is to ignore the various lists about all the equipment you need to purchase in order to make a tempera painting. Buy whatever you feel comfortable with, even if only one brush and two pigments. Crack an egg, temper the paint in a small saucer, and dig in! That's really the only way to know what you need or want. Otherwise, you might talk yourself out of painting.
Dennis

Last edited by Dennis H; 14-04-08 at 10:40 PM. Reason: Misspelling
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 16-04-08, 01:20 AM
Salamander's Avatar
Salamander Salamander is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 340
Default

Dennis has said it all! Just do it!!!! (then show us)
-eino
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 21-04-08, 06:39 AM
jpohl's Avatar
jpohl jpohl is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NWT, Canada
Posts: 246
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Salamander View Post
Dennis has said it all! Just do it!!!! (then show us)
-eino

i intend to.especially after all the amazing advice i've received here, but please be patient with me... i have seven panels to work at once... so no way no how am i talking myself out of things.. and the baby is starting to sleep as of four nights touch wood..

so i've gotten a wee little distracted with munsell and bargue.....

and then i'll have to get some decent copy work...
but first things first...
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 21-04-08, 04:40 PM
Rosemary Rosemary is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Seattle, WA U.S.A.
Posts: 65
Default

I have a soft hog bristle brush that is about 1/2 inch in diameter at ferrule and has bristles about 2 inches long. The bristles are untrimmed so that they taper to a very fine point. It is the brushe that oil painters used to paint very feathery trees about 200 years ago. You use it by tapping the very tips in paint and then tapping lightly on the support surface. You have to be careful to not get so much paint in it that the bristles adhere to each other. The bristles splay out about to a 1.5 inch diameter and should stay in that splayed position in use. It is great for oil blending but when I have tried to use it for egg tempera, the ET dries too fast and I don't get the same effect. Maybe if the room was a bit more humid to slow the drying on the brush it would work with ET. Problem is that the brush must be dry to use, so once it needs washing, you can't use it like that until it is dry again. I think this is the brush Thompson is describing. I learned about it when I sat in on a class in classical oil techniques that my friend in Paris was taking.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:11 AM.
Design modifications, graphics and CSS by RobM
June 2010



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.