Egg Tempera Forums

Go Back   Egg Tempera Forums > The Forums > The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues

The Forum for Tempera Painting Issues Sharing the knowledge and experience of fellow tempera painters.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 18-11-10, 01:54 PM
Koo Schadler's Avatar
Koo Schadler Koo Schadler is offline
Tempera Painter
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Alstead, NH & Zirahuen, Mexico
Posts: 299
Default

I too had heard (from an et painter who uses one) that egg tempera gums up an air brush. However I'm teaching a tempera workshop in Sedona this week and one of the students brought his air brush equipment, and thus far it is working great! Once he has properly tempered his paint, i.e. has his egg to pigment ratio correct, he thins the paint quite a bit, so as not to gum up the works. This means the layer of paint he is applying is super thin, and hence he has to do it several times to get coverage. He also is applying in between paint layers a very much watered down "nourishing layer" (as icon painters refer to it) of just egg yolk medium. He is an already talented and experienced illustrator with a sure touch and many years experience with air brush, which no doubt helps. His painting looks great - but for now I''ll stick with my sponges.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 18-11-10, 04:29 PM
PhilS's Avatar
PhilS PhilS is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Sargentville, Maine
Posts: 222
Default

For smooth gradations, I use a kolinsky sable one-inch flat brush (not a round!). I mix up five different values, from light to dark and apply the paint in stripes, overlapping each one. It is important to vary the angle of the strokes. I then mix up five new shades, one value lighter than the first series, and thin the paint WAY down (once you have the egg/pigment ratio right, it doesn't seem to matter how much water you add.) Again, vary the angle of the brush strokes and keep the brush moving, or you will pick up the underlying paint. It seems that you are not applying any paint at first, but gradually you build up a "haze" of color over the underpainting. This creates a wonderful opalescence and gives a complex depth to the sky.

If you vary the colors slightly layer to layer, it makes it even more interesting.

It sounds tedious, but I can do a sky in an afternoon with a perfectly smooth gradation and absolutely no brush strokes visible.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 19-11-10, 03:12 AM
Bron's Avatar
Bron Bron is offline
Framewright
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: South Bend, IN
Posts: 57
Default

Koo, PhilS, I would love to see some examples.

I did some porcelain restoration early in my career, using air brushes. NC Lacquer dries very rapidy, so you have to be aware of what the brush is doing. My experience, is that ET remains "soluble" for a short period after drying; but when I'm airbrushing color, it's all pretty quick, minutes, dry, a few minutes, more spraying, drying, building up the color. I started with spray equipment as a teenager, and the first principle of any paint application method, is don't let the paint dry on the equipment.

As to technique, I'm very willing to try new, see here, but when the new isn't better ... I'll stick with what works. I'm not much into arcane ritual, unless it gets me the image I want.

__________________
Bron

http://frame-notes.blogspot.com/

http://bronislausjanulis.com/Site/Home.html

Last edited by Bron; 19-11-10 at 03:23 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 19-11-10, 09:56 PM
PhilS's Avatar
PhilS PhilS is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Sargentville, Maine
Posts: 222
Default

Bron,
It's hard to tell from the web images, but if you go to my galleries at http://www.philschirmer.com, you can see several of my skies. "Buddha" and "Noon" are probably the best examples. What you lose in the web version is the depth created by the layering.
Good luck!
Phil
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 21-11-10, 10:50 PM
Bron's Avatar
Bron Bron is offline
Framewright
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: South Bend, IN
Posts: 57
Default

Phil,

From what I could see, the gradations are quite smooth; like Koo's technique, and yours, I'll try them. Feel free to email me some larger images: bronislaus@gmail.com

Thanks,

Bron
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 24-11-10, 12:13 AM
mona's Avatar
mona mona is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 205
Default Any tips on glazing a smooth sky?

Bron, I have preferred not using sponges on my skies, although I like the results others like Koo and Rob Milliken get with sponges. I don't like using air brush either. My approach is similar to Phil's although I don't think I've done as many as five different tones or that I'm conscious of being so methodical, but I blend using small strokes in multiple directions, scumbling and glazing. As Phil states, what is key is the build-up and the effect it produces, and I very much like Phil's description that a 'haze' builds up. There is no way other than seeing this first-hand, too, so online only gives you a vague sense of it, but the key is don't quit too early and don't think you can't blend with this medium; you can!

You are welcome to check out examples of blended skies on my website as well at http://www.monadianeconner.com (check my "nature, animals and flowers" gallery and my retrospective "illustration" gallery).

Mona
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:09 AM.
Design modifications, graphics and CSS by RobM
June 2010



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.