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Other Art Related Issues Discuss other art related issues not connected with tempera

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  #11  
Old 24-02-07, 04:47 PM
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Salamander Salamander is offline
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Here is a link to some recipes for you:
http://studioproducts.com/recipes/recipe.html
The forum there miight also have some pertinent information.
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  #12  
Old 24-02-07, 05:21 PM
miss pixel miss pixel is offline
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Default varishes etc

Hi I have tried to register for the Cennini forum but it wont let me do it (both password fields have not been filled in and I can only see one) and nor can I send an e-mail to the administrators, any suggestions please?
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  #13  
Old 24-02-07, 08:00 PM
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Bert Congdon Bert Congdon is offline
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O.K. David. I found your question yesterday but was interrupted, and I lost it. I just now found it again, so here goes: I have found only one use for beeswax. I will use it for watercolor where I want to save a spot. I will "color" it with wax crayon, and I know that spot will never again accept WC. Every piece of art that I have seen finished with beeswax has been un even and splotchy. I would never use it for a finished varnish. Its natural color is amber. What you use might be bleached white, but it will return to its original color. Do you like green skies?

Impasto is oil color mixed with beeswax (or other waxes). I have seenn it put on almost 1/4 inch thick. Don't bring it to Texas unles you have something under it to catch the drippings. Wax mixed with paint or varnish will never harden. Ever try varnishing a waxed floor? The only thing I know that will remove wax is amonia, and I am not sure what that does for a painting.

Miss Pixel, I should have capitalized saluvar, hence Saluvar. It is a brand name made up by a company for one of their products. It is listed in many art catalogs in this country. I thought it was a good idea at first, i.e. after fifty years remove it with the dirtand recoat it all nice and clean, but I read an aricle that said after five years thier tests showed it was harder to get off than dammar, and after fifty years it ain't comin' off. I'm not sure how they know that.

As Alessandra pointed, paint/enamel/oil/varnish harden in two ways, the solvents dry and the resin or oil oxidizes the same as cement, but the solvents don't have to dry for the resin to harden. That is why cement poured under water will harden. It grabs the oxygen from the water, and the longer it stays wet, the harder it gets. That is why sheets of plastic are laid over freshly poured highways...to slow uo the drying.

Miss Pixel, I am almost certain you can find oil base enamel undercoat in the U.K., but remember it has nothing to do with ET. It is for preparing canvasses for oil painting. We used to use White lead, and you still can. Get a qt of enamel undercoat (ask them no to shake it). Open it without stirring, pour off the liquid (vehicle) and mix in your white lead color to get a consistancy that you can brush on. It won't bite you, but be verrrrry carefful when you sand it. Take it outsideand and wear a mask.
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  #14  
Old 24-02-07, 08:25 PM
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RobM RobM is offline
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Hi Miss P,
Like yourself I had a job registering at Cennini, I could only see one password field like yourself but then look again very closely.....seems as though the set up is a bit wrong. Try again and then when you get to adding your password look very closely immediately to the right of that box. There is about 2 mm of another box with a letter C above it. (Guess that means Confirm password.) Get your mouse in there, the cursor should light up and just type your password again, that should do the trick......Hopefully!!

Rob
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  #15  
Old 24-02-07, 09:02 PM
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RobM RobM is offline
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It could be a browser problem. If you do have a computer with loads of free space it is always worthwhile downloading other browsers as an alternative. (Netscape and Firefox, just Google them for free downloads)
They are free to obtain, just make sure you uncheck the 'use as my default browser' if you are really happy with your current browser.
At least that way you can try different web address with different browsers ........!!
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  #16  
Old 26-02-07, 07:12 PM
miss pixel miss pixel is offline
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Default varnishes etc

HI Guys, thanks a lot for all this useful advice re: saluvar and browsers, I will give them a try.
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  #17  
Old 27-02-07, 01:40 AM
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Iíve been using Gamlinís GamVar varnish. It was formulated in cooperation with The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. Once applied it looks just almost like dammar except it is water clear so it doesnít give the painting a yellow cast. It comes in a kit with solid resin tears and a jar of solvent. The solvent is not turpentine but a form of mineral spirits. It is clamed that it will not yellow in time to the degree dammar does, and may be removed easily with mineral spirits no matter how long it has been on the painting. It is available only in gloss although some painters add wax to give a matt finish.
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  #18  
Old 27-02-07, 09:30 AM
miss pixel miss pixel is offline
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Default varnishes etc

Hi DLH, do you use this varnish at the end when you have finished painting & when its dry, or during painting if paint sinks ? some people suggest using dammar during painting to stop paint sinking, because it dries so quickly. Others say leave the varnish to dry for 6 months before painting over it; and some say dont use it at all until the painting is finished because it takes up to a year to dry completely. There seems to be a lot of conflicting opinions on the properties of dammar varnish.
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  #19  
Old 27-02-07, 02:45 PM
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Bert Congdon Bert Congdon is offline
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You didn't ask me, but here is my opinion anyway. Wait until it is dry and hard, i.e. dry in a few minutes, for ET hard in a year, for oil six months.
Miss pixel when I consider a varnish, I consider along with other things the color in its natural state, not its bleached state, because it will likely return to its natural color. When I get the natural damar resin it has no color. I like that. I never use wax.
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  #20  
Old 27-02-07, 06:55 PM
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Dennis H Dennis H is offline
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By the way, the acrylic varnish Bert refers to is spelled Soluvar. It's made by Liquitex, and comes in gloss and matte finish.
http://www.liquitex.com/Products/varsoluvargloss.cfm

Dennis
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