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Old 04-11-04, 06:54 AM
odyssic
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Default Broad areas of color

Hello,

I'm attempting to get broad areas of flat color. Subtle variations would be ok, but the crosshatching won't really work in this case. Any advice about how to do this? Thanks!

Steven
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Old 05-11-04, 02:14 AM
turlogh turlogh is offline
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Default Re: Broad areas of color

Quote:
Originally Posted by odyssic
Hello,
I'm attempting to get broad areas of flat color. Subtle variations would be ok, but the crosshatching won't really work in this case. Any advice about how to do this? Thanks!
Broad areas of flat color are not ET's strong point.

With patience, you can get flat areas of color by drybrushing; it just takes a lot of patience. I have also had some success applying paint with a wide flat sable brush. It takes a little practice to create even tones. Adding white makes this much easier, since it reduces transparency. The thing to remember is that you can't do this in a single layer, but will be building up multiple layers of semi-opaque paint.
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Old 18-11-04, 07:04 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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You will want to mix the exact color you want the end result to be, as you won't be using transparency at all. I recommend mixing a large batch of the color without egg, using whichever pigments you want. Then take some of that and add egg medium to it to paint with, but keep most in reserve. That way, if you have to paint in more than one session, you will still have the same exact color for next time.
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Old 14-11-05, 10:22 PM
odyssic
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Thanks!

So I can't do many very watery washes, one over another?

Steven
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Old 15-11-05, 01:09 AM
turlogh turlogh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odyssic
So I can't do many very watery washes, one over another?
Of course you can. Make sure each later is thoroughly dry before washing over it. Even tones are difficult to achieve this way, but you might like the effect.
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Old 15-11-05, 10:01 PM
odyssic
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Thanks! I did try that for a while. I found it very difficult in the end. I'm trying just feathering on very light strokes in multiple layers now. It seems to be working better, and creating a surface that is more stable and less likely to crack/ peel/ rub off, etc.

Steven
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Old 15-11-05, 10:30 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Sorry, I was rather dogmatic there. Of course you can do lots of thin washes. It's just a lot trickier to keep the color evenly "broad and flat". What I suggested above produces a more opaque, controlled effect, which sounded like what you were asking for.

Truth to tell, I don't use that technique much, as I prefer the inner glow that comes from multiple transparent and translucent layers. But if you really need broad, flat color, it will do the trick.
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Old 25-05-06, 01:58 PM
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jeff jeff is offline
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I find this a problem area with tempera too. I don't think that tempera is any harder to make into even toned areas than acrylic and yet we don't normally think to paint acrylic in tiny strokes. Also the constant strokes can create a rather deadening mechanical effect to the painting.

I realise that applying many translucent layers is one of the very special effects that tempera excels in but why should I do it by stroking the paint? I think I must be missing something and would like to be corrected or educated on this point.

desparate
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Old 25-05-06, 04:11 PM
odyssic
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Jeff,

For one thing, I don't think it is completely by choice. The tempera is not water proof for quite a while (weeks, months, a year) after laying it down. So if you do a broad flat layer, over another, unless you're very quick with it, it will tend to pick up the bottom layer. I think the fine strokes are a way to be delicate with the under layer and not pick it up.

I've tried the wash over wash but it works much better if the colors dry at least over night first for the underlayer... the longer the better probably.

It's less of a problem on canvas with a little tooth because that will hold the color in place more than a gesso ground, but then you have the flexing issue to contend with if it isn't stretched over a panel.

Steven
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Old 26-05-06, 11:36 PM
arbrador arbrador is offline
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Default even tones with tempera

I learned in Koo Schadler's workshop to achieve smooth areas by using cosmetic sponges. The brand MAC seem to work the best. Also it helps to add a little white (titanium and zinc in equal parts) to each color in the lower levels.
Good luck!
Lora
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