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  #11  
Old 30-11-04, 11:30 PM
turlogh turlogh is offline
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Default Re: Removing varnish

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dana Spottswood
Question: is there any way I can remove the varnish without harming the ET?
One of the reasons to use dammar is that it can be removed fairly easily (in the normal course of events, it should be removed and replaced every 50 years or so as it soaks up environmental contaminants and becomes yellower and more brittle).

Dammar is soluble in turpentine. ET is not. Working slowly and carefully, using cotton swabs or cotton balls moistened with good-quality turpentine, you can take the dammar off without affecting the ET.

Good luck.
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  #12  
Old 02-12-04, 01:47 PM
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Dennis H Dennis H is offline
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Back to Rob's post:
Rob, what do you use to attach the painting panel to the backing board? Do you ever have trouble with it delaminating?
Thanks,
D.
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  #13  
Old 02-12-04, 04:07 PM
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RobM RobM is offline
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Dennis,
I use a product called NoNails which is a very strong wood adhesive.
The gessoed panel is 6mm thick MDF and so is the backing board. Makes for quite a heavy picture. No delamination as yet and I have been using this method for quite a few years. I cannot physically pull apart two pieces of wood that have been glued with this product which is applied with a sealant gun.
Just going back to glass issue.........I have now stopped putting the works behind glass as quite a few viewers found that they were really purchasing an expensive morror. They prefer to view the works without the glass and it is less expense and hassle for me when framing. (Plus the weight issue with my large pieces.) So far, no paintings have been damaged.
Rob
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  #14  
Old 17-12-04, 07:22 PM
T Newson
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Default alkaline?

I have a question in response to Jason Maranto's post: he wrote: "I would use 100% rag museum boards for filler/mats if needed... although you want to get the unbuffered -- the protein content of the egg tempera may react negatively to an overly alkaline environment."

I thought the buffering was done with calcium carbonate - it's neutral pH, correct? So not alkaline?

However I find the detail about protein reacting negatively with alkaline materials to be interesting, one more item to put in my trove of ET related facts!
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  #15  
Old 18-12-04, 10:57 PM
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I am new here and have been reading this post. I know nothing of ET painting as I am just learning. Frankly you are scaring me. Can ET really be scratched that easily? The ET paintings I have seen in museums didn't show this much ware and tare and they had no glass over them. How much more fragile are they than say oil?
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  #16  
Old 19-12-04, 09:01 AM
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RobM RobM is offline
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Danny,
As you read more and more posts you will get even more scared :!:
Egg tempera is unlike any other mediums and for me the fun is learning to control a medium that wants to control you. It does take a while to get to know the handling characteristics of tempera and we are all here to help you.
Back to your question, yes egg tempera is a fragile paint in its early stages and should be protected. Since the beginning of this post I have been persuaded by a couple of my galleries not to hide the works behind glass. I just insist that the galleries take extra care with the works.
Initially the paint is quite soft and leathery but as time goes by an the chemical reactions in the paint diminish the paint does alter and becomes very hard and less likely to damage.
Rob
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  #17  
Old 14-03-06, 02:03 PM
APD453
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Default Problems with varnish

:-( I am from Greece and I have a big problem with the varnish. I am painter of traditional Christian Icons on wood. I am looking for a good varnish thinner with white spirit (specialy mat). I used at the past a lot of varnishes but I had alot of problems. Same of them are sticky and same of them are being white. I used at the past Sigma Mat varnish and was very very good but from the factory stop to produce it.
There is anyone who knows a very good varnish for aggtempera on wood.
My e-mail adress is apd453@yahoo.gr.
This site is excelent!!!!!!!!!
Thanks alot
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  #18  
Old 24-09-06, 02:48 PM
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I've been experimenting a bit lately with varnish and would point out that it will also affect the colour - some colours more than others. I have been using damar varnish and also beeswax varnish. My judgment is that the beeswax works best if it is applied in several thin coats and then polished carefully. It doesn't seem to have a strong effect on the colours and in fact in some paintings can enhance the colour depth perfectly. It really is a case of suck it and see.

I do have a question about using acrylic varnishes though. Has anyone done that?

jeff bryant
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  #19  
Old 24-09-06, 07:59 PM
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I dont use acrylic varnish on acrylics and I dought if I would use it on a fresh ET painting, maybe after 2 years or so when the ET is stable.

but beewax is great!

just stick to the beewax!
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  #20  
Old 25-09-06, 01:15 AM
JeanM JeanM is offline
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Default Framimg and varnishing a painting

I seem to remember reading that bees wax darkens with age. Has anyone else heard this? Maybe I'm wrong. I have also tried damar and it worked well on one painting after I buffed like crazy to remove the false-looking sheen. I have read that damar will yellow with age, though. I have also used a matt acrylic varnish and it's OK, but actually I prefer no varnish at all.
Jean
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