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Old 23-03-07, 08:52 AM
sabine sabine is offline
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Default different glue qualities??

hi :-)

I have had some trouble gluing my canvas lately - it seems I can't strech them right anymore... First I thougt it was the linen that wasn't good enough (false linen??)... it stays all "floppy" (??)

then I used a linen that I already used and that is perfectly fine - but it didn't go any better

but I ran out of my rabbit skin glue and had to buy some new - they didn't have rsg in the store, so I bought just "skin glue"

I diluted it at the same proportions I usually do for a first coat (1/12) but it doesn't seem to be strong enough

never had THIS problem before!!

Do you think RSG is stronger than Skin glue and taht I should change the dilution? What else could the trouble be?

I know most of you don't use canvas, but maybe some one could help me?

Sabine
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Old 23-03-07, 11:21 AM
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Bert Congdon Bert Congdon is offline
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Default Glue

What are you gluing the canvas to?
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Old 23-03-07, 12:37 PM
sabine sabine is offline
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to chassis (I've been said here that's the word to use even in "english ;))
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Old 23-03-07, 01:26 PM
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Bert Congdon Bert Congdon is offline
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Default gkue

My hide glue comes in little amber balls that are called pearls. I put a handful or two in a cofee can, add enough water to cover them and warm it in warm water until dissolved. With a large brush I slop a coat on the wood and a coat on the canvass, then carefully lower the canvass onto the wood. I leave enough canvass around the edge to reach around onto the back. I use a piece of plastic with a smooth edge to squeeze out any air bubbles and excess paste. I work this around onto the back and staple it. After drying a couple of days, the canvas cannot be torn off. I have pieces of plastic I purchased in a paint store for working bubbles out of wallpaper, but the plastic case that a CD comes in works just as well.

I prefer hide glue with a middle of the road number, to rabbit skin glue, which does not great glue trength.
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Old 23-03-07, 05:16 PM
sabine sabine is offline
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oh, I'm sorry, apparently I used the wrong words...

I don't try to glue canvas to a panel ("maroufler" in french) but to strech it (?) on a chassis (streccher??) - I use the glue to size it and thaen for one or 2 gesso coats...

OUch, too difficult :-?

Thank you for you effort in answering me Bert :grin: I did find an answer by the way, and IN FRENCH :lol:

Apparently the glue they sell now tends to have less and less glue into it... could explain my problem - and maybe I didn't wash my linen enough?

If any frenchspeaker comes this way, this is a very usefull site: http://www.dotapea.com/
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Old 24-03-07, 12:49 AM
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There is another way of applying hide glue rather than by painting it on that might help with this problem. You let the warm solution cool down till it soidifies into a jelly. The correct strength of the glue can then be assertained by gently tearing the glue with your fingers. If if sort of crumbles apart it is too weak. It should break cleanly. Having got the right quality you apply it by hand and spread it. The warmth of your hand melts it a bit. A palette knife can be used to smooth it more. I should say that this is really for sizing not gesso which is painted on liquid.

jeff
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Old 25-03-07, 10:27 AM
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thank jeff for the tip to check the quality of the glue, I will try it -

I have more doubt about the "cold sizing": can this reaaly be done?? does it work?? I ALWAYS read that sizing had to be made with a quite warm glue, and as quick as possible so it remains warm...
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Old 25-03-07, 11:13 AM
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I too have doubts about cold sizing. The purpose of the size is ro soak the fabric with glue so the oil won't soak in snd rot it. There should be as little as possible on the surface so the gesso doesn't let loose. If you are using acrylic gesso, then the glue is not necessary. I put a thin coat of glue on after I have stretched it as tight as possible, then apply the oil (enamel undercoat).
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Old 27-03-07, 01:19 AM
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The cold sizing I think works about as well as hot sizing because it acts as a barrier to oil. It is a bit difficult to apply and is certainly very messy. Mainly I was thinking that it might be the best way to check the correct glue strength. The glue can be of course be melted again. I think that some conservators have considered in the past that saturating the canvas with glue is not conducive to its long term preservation - hence this approach.

jeff
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Old 27-03-07, 04:05 AM
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Slightly off topic, but I know a few painters around here who size their linen with a thin solution of acrylic matte medium. I'd have to ask them for the proportions -- maybe something like 1:2 or 1:3 acrylic to water. They paint over that with white lead in linseed oil or an alkyd resin/titanium white primer. One reason they say they don't like to use RSG sizing any more is how it reacts to our humid southern climate. They tell me that their RSG sized canvases fluctuate too much between taut and floppy as our weather changes. We can swing from 90% to 30% humidity in a day.
I don't know if what they say, or do, is right but I thought I'd pass it on.
Reporting from Georgia,
Dennis
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