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  #1  
Old 14-04-06, 05:15 PM
connie kirk
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Default Prussian blue

I have a prussian blue that I have used in the past with no graininess, but recently the same blue has developed a grit that cannot be felt with the fingers but is very pronounced when laid down as paint. Any idea on what this might be? I have had to stop using it. Thanks.
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Old 16-04-06, 12:51 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Prussian Blue is one of those super fine, super strong pigments based on dyes which need to be very finely ground. I had a problem with graininess/ dry pigment rubbing off with mine years ago because I hadn't ground it carefully enough at the start. Since I re-ground it, it has been fine.

Did your pigment dry out, even partially? That can cause it to go grainy.
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Old 18-04-06, 12:22 PM
connie kirk
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Default Prussian blue

I will try regrinding. I am not at all sure if it has dried out! Thanks for the ideas.
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Old 14-05-06, 02:03 PM
dakini_painter
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Default Prussian blue

Hi,

Sorry about the lateness of the reply, however...

I've used Prussian blue a few times with satisfaction. I do not store my pigments ground into a paste. Prussian blue is one color that likes a drop of alcohol (isopropyl 91%) added to the pigment before adding your water and egg medium. I am using the Prussian Blue dry pigment from Williamsburg.

This trick with the alcohol works well with other modern organic pigments that are very fine and difficult to disperse properly in water alone. For the phthalo colors, the addition of chalk to your dry pigment will help bring up the color as well as aid dispersion and paint application.

Hope that helps (if belatedly).
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Old 23-07-06, 12:02 AM
connie kirk
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Thanks for your "late" reply, here is an even later one--
A quote from Daniel Thompson on "Palettes for Tempera",

"The transparent colors, the siennas, viridian, aureolin, the red lakes, Prussian blue [if it be used at all], and so on, should be kept in reserve for use where nothing else will do, and not introduced casually into mixtures."[pp. 78-79]

So maybe it is not worth the trouble, except when neccessary!
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Old 28-08-06, 03:09 PM
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Dimitris C. Milionis Dimitris C. Milionis is offline
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Prussian blue

wow what a nasty color, I still add 3 drops of alcahol to the mix and add carbon black PBk 7 to make a nice paynes gray
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Old 29-08-06, 05:23 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Right. I'm going to have to stand up for the underdog.

I love Prussian Blue. Its intense, clear brilliance is like no other. If you don't use Phthalo Blue (and I don't), Prussian is invaluable for glowing, rich, intense blue-blacks.

With the greatest possible respect to Daniel V. Thompson, the transparent colors are an indispensable addition to any tempera painter's palette. If all he can think of is to introduce them into mixtures (rather than glaze them over other colors to preserve their brilliance and intense luminosity) then no wonder he views them with disappointment.
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Old 29-08-06, 07:05 PM
sabine sabine is offline
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I love prussion blue and it's transparency too :grin:
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Old 31-08-06, 11:34 PM
David McKay David McKay is offline
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Alessandra: With respect, I think what Thompson meant is that transparent colours should not be used casually in mixtures but reserved for glazing due to their transparent qualities. I do agree with you in that we should experiment and use whatever we have and hope we discover something interesting and valuable for our own particular needs. David
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Old 01-09-06, 08:15 AM
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Dimitris C. Milionis Dimitris C. Milionis is offline
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Today most schools of fine art do not train their art students [painting class] in learning to discover, expose and experiment with the tools of the trade and accomplish that level of the craft required by fine art galleries.

...it is a shame, that transparent colors are the most exotic of all when used to their potential.

I too seek excellence in my work transparent colors is the path to a perfect picture painting.
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