Egg Tempera Forums

Go Back   Egg Tempera Forums > The Forums > Critique Forum

Critique Forum Post your work here for constructive criticism

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 23-06-07, 01:44 AM
Jane
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default My First ET

Finally after leaving it for a year and coming back it is done. My second one is done and I am working on 3 and 4! I know my technique needs work! Interested in comments.



http://www.mypicshare.com/1zbab5shpic.html


http://www.mypicshare.com/p2emqx8ipic.html

Last edited by Jane; 23-06-07 at 01:46 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 23-06-07, 02:32 AM
alexgarcia
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jane,

For your first painting I think it is done well.

What are the dimensions of this work?

Alex
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 23-06-07, 04:37 AM
Salamander's Avatar
Salamander Salamander is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 340
Default

Really pretty good there Jane! Great expression. I'd certainly have to see more of your work to see where you wanted to go with it to have much more of a suggestion. Let's see the next one.
- Eric in Oceanside.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 24-06-07, 04:44 PM
Jane
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alex & Eric thanks for your input.

Alex the dimensions are 9"X12".

Here is ET#2...
http://www.mypicshare.com/8yy3mu53pic.html

11"X14"
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 25-06-07, 05:13 PM
JanMoore JanMoore is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Colorado
Posts: 41
Default Jane's paintings

Jane -- these are good for your first ones! I offer a few tips to improve them.

First, portraits can be difficult. The skin tones (especially in the 2nd one) are too pale and pasty. You can correct this by applying a transparent (i.e. thin) layer of red, or red plus yellow. Do some studying of colors for skin tones. No one is white, nor are eyes or teeth.

Next, your figure will look rounder if your transitions from light to shadow are more subtle. Use more intermediary value changes and blend them gradually. Only in strong light situations will a figure have sharp shadow lines. I also recommend using some dry brush to join the values smoothly -- brush an intermediary value so it covers a little bit of each of the other values.

Look closer at your source (either model or photo) and paint what you see, not what you think you see, except with photos. You probably did this from a photo which translates the lights too white and loses the subtle value changes. You'll need to learn how to compensate for what the the camera leaves out.

I hope this clear.

Last edited by JanMoore; 25-06-07 at 05:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 25-06-07, 05:25 PM
Jane
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Smile

Thanks for the critique Jan -

I will be able to use your suggestions in #'s 3 & 4 which are underway. I have found that I tend to see in a very 'high value' way and have to force myself to tone things down. So, your suggestions are welcomed as I am trying to figure this out on my own.

Jane
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 25-06-07, 06:38 PM
alexgarcia
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jane,

I agree for your first few paintings they are done well.

I would recommend refining the painting even more. The beauty of egg tempera is that you can continue to add layers of refinement. Especially, as Jan noted, in the value transitions. I usually start with large brushes and as I continue to refine the work I use smaller brushes as I go.

I would also recommend you introduce a variety of colors into the work. Egg tempera is versatile in this aspect also because if a color's saturation is too high you can introduce other colors to help tone them down a bit. As you add warms and cools to the surface in both glazes, scumbles and dry brush you will begin to achieve a rich and beautiful surface quality which is distincitve of the medium.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 25-06-07, 09:07 PM
Jane
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Smile

Thank you Alex...it is very helpful to get specific feed back...I feel like light bulbs are going on in my head now :) ( ie: big to little brushes and color transitions,... as soon as I read your suggestions I realized how I could use these suggestions in the paintings I am working on now, and it makes me feel much more positive and less hesitant) . In fact with all the light bulbs popping on I am no longer so much in the dark!

Hopefully there will be improvement in my next pieces!

Thanks once again for taking the time to respond.

Jane
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-07-07, 04:06 AM
mona's Avatar
mona mona is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 205
Default My First ET

Jane,

While all the comments are valid and useful, I would just like to encourage you at the same time about the wonderful bold confidence your first two
portrait attempts reveal. Please don't sacrifice or lose your bold approach just because you are also working on refining your technique.

There is a kind of drama within your first two paintings that not many can perceive in approaching portraiture. Hang on to that good stuff! And while it's true that skin isn't really white, it can be almost white in a dramatically lit portrait like your second one. I tend to have the opposite problem and make everything too 'standard flesh tone', while meanwhile I love that wonderful porcelain renaissance skin.

Usually whites in light areas of the skin have more depth if they are painted using a very light skin tone or ochre over a darker ground color, or 'scumbled' (painting lighter strokes over a darker area). As forum members are pointing out, the advantage of this medium is the power of translucency. Capitalize on building up your color through multiple layers juxtaposed and partly revealed, allowing the viewer's eyes to blend them.

Looking forward to seeing more of your paintings!
Mona
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:45 AM.
Design modifications, graphics and CSS by RobM
June 2010



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.