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Old 11-04-04, 11:27 AM
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PhilS PhilS is offline
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Default Mold ("Mould" to you Brits)

For what it's worth, I was recently visiting my parents and they showed me some mold on a painting I had given them back in 1987. It had little blooms all over the surface. I took the painting out of the glass frame and wiped it off with a cotton ball. The mold was dry as dust and lifted right off. Now the painting looks brand new. I was also pleased to notice that there was no cracking whatsoever on the surface. It was the first time I had looked closely at one of my older paintings.
Two things learned: one, I won't frame under glass again because it seems to promote mold (though the mold is easy to remove). Two, the untempered masonite/traditional gesso combination is apparently stable.
On a more ominous note, a Home Depot store recently opened in my area and I noticed it doesn't carry untempered masonite. I asked the lumber manager why not. "We just don't" he replied condescendingly. The other lumberyard in town still stocks it, but Home Depot has cut into his business so much it appears he's going to be closing down.
Phil
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Old 11-04-04, 05:01 PM
Magi Magi is offline
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Hi, I am a new member to the forum and want to thank everyone for all the information so freely provided here. This is my first post, but I have been reading all the posts since December when I happened upon this site.

I notice that some ET artists use oil of cloves in the egg mixture. Phil, I can't remember if you do or not. I understand that oil of cloves prevents mould and is a preservative. Did you use oil of cloves for your parents' picture?

I am just beginning to experiment with ET and have purchased from the health food store (no one else seems to carry it) what is labelled "Clove Bud" by Aura Cacia. It is 100% pure essential oil. Is this the same as "Oil of Cloves". I asked for Oil of Cloves, so assume it is, but because it actually does not say that, I am cautious.

Is there a way to frame ET pictures behind glass that would allow air flow to prevent mould from forming? I was going to frame mine behind glass to protect the vulnerable surface.

Happy Easter everyone!
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Old 11-04-04, 05:35 PM
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RobM RobM is offline
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Phil,
I'm so grateful that you provided a translation of Mold........
I will still send my works out under glass. I do not seal the back of the frame and this allows for a little movement of air. I would rather that a little bit of mold accumulate than a dirty great scratch in the gallery handling. I can advise a client re the mold......a scratch is a different matter, that would need a match of colour (Translation for Phil.....'Color' :grin: )
(Don't you just hate all this multi lingual stuff).

Magi

I've never used any additives with my ET's and have only had a little problem with Ultramarine blue when it was stored in a dark store room. It developed a little mold which brushed off just as Phil mentioned.

Oil of cloves?????....I only use it for tooth ache....Brilliant stuff...too good to be wasted in paint!!

I agree that you should frame your piccies initially behind glass, the ET paint surface is very vunerable in the first 6 - 12 months.
Somewhere I put up a post on this forum where I describe with a diagram how I frame my pix . This allows for a cerain amount of air flow.
I'll try and find that post and if you don't find it befoe me I'll add it to this post.

Yup.....happy easter to all
Rob


OK I found it
http://www.eggtempera.com/newforum/viewtopic.php?t=180
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Old 11-04-04, 07:17 PM
Magi Magi is offline
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Rob, thanks for your prompt reply and also the diagram post. You are very helpful.
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Old 12-04-04, 02:50 AM
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Dennis H Dennis H is offline
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For what it's worth, I've had mold grow on both glazed (translation: under glass) and unglazed (not under glass :grin: ) Like Phil I just wiped it off the painting with a cotton ball. Recently, after a damp spell, I found some spots on a 13-year-old painting (unglazed). After cleaning off the mold, I took the opportunity to rub up the entire painting with a clean cotton ball. It buffed up to a beautiful low-lustre sheen, just like the books say.

Like Rob, I tend to frame my paintings under glass. I have had to color-match scratches from poor handling by galleries when I sent them without glass or acrylic. I prefer to see the painting without all theose reflections getting in the way. But, I also worry about airborne dirt sticking to the paintings. The naked 13-year-old above showed some signs of greasy air.

Dennis
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Old 12-04-04, 11:22 AM
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PhilS PhilS is offline
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I'm with with Rob, Magi. It isn't necessary to add anything to the pure egg/pigment mixture to keep it from molding or going bad. Some people advocate using vinegar or acetic acid and maybe it works, but maybe it doesn't - why take the risk?
I went to the Farnsworth recently to recharge the old batteries (in a bit of a rut this winter...) and noticed that about half of Andrew Wyeth's temperas are under glass, half not. Hmmm... Amazingly, he doesn't use museum glass and I found myself crouching and standing on tiptoe to get around the glare.
Better to not use glass (though I agree, Dennis, my galleries invariably scratch the surface of one or two a year).
Phil
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Old 13-04-04, 12:03 AM
K. Lee
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Spike lavender if you can find it might be of use. I forgot where I read it, but this oil deters things (presumably chemo receptors on a living organism, ie. bats, rats, mold).

I just looked up spike lavender in Mayer, Ralph. "The Artist's Handbook of Materials and Techniques Fifth Edition" 1991, Viking Penguin, and one could conclude that this oil predates or was around when turpentine and oil painting began, or also when tempera painting was flourishing.

As far as artists' works in museums, I wouldn't even consider appearence or display of work as anything but presentation. That is, with today's mechanisms available to reproduction and/or transfer of images, problems of deterioration (such as evident even in this topic) that the work seen is even the original. If one could secure documentation then that is another matter all together or at least evidence pro-originallity.


Lee (original American/part-english, but definately not British. I'm more of a German or Flemish at heart). :grin:
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Old 13-04-04, 05:15 AM
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<Delurking out of curiosity>

A general question regarding environment breakdown of ET paintings..

What is the earliest anyone has seen mold/cracking/peeling etc on a ET painting?

I have some paintings that are about six months old (which is when I started on ET). I violate just about every good rule mentioned here -- some are on claybord, some are on acrylic-gesso, some on oil-gesso, some are done using tube temperas, painting application is sometimes heavy etc. But none of them show any damage whatsoever: no cracking, no peeling, no fading, no mold etc.

How long before I see damage, I wonder?

PS: I don't generally care for longevity as I enjoy the act more than the result and generally don't sell my paintings at all. So, this is really not an issue but I am curious still.

<Back to lurking>
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Old 13-04-04, 07:46 AM
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Default Zinc Oxide

Hi everyone
I'm currently doing a science investigation on tempera and I heard something about zinc oxide being used to stop mould?? If anyone knows about this could you please tell me.
Thank you,
Jessica
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  #10  
Old 23-11-05, 06:39 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Zinc Oxide is a mild antiseptic (That's why it is used in some medicine creams). I have occasionally had mold grow in my wet pigments (not, thank goodness, on my paintings). I have noticed Yellow Ochres to be particularly susceptible. When I have mixed Yellow Ochres with Titanium White, they have also sometimes molded. But when I have mixed them with Zinc White they have not.

I realize this is probably far too late to be of use to you, Jessica, but I thought I would mention.

As for clove oil or lavender oil, although I suppose they can be preservatives, be aware that they are *essential* oils. That is, over time they evaporate away completely. They may provide some protection against mold for a while, but they can't be considered a cure-all.

The main point seems to be not to seal up the painting, whether under glass or in some other way. I mostly hold my breath and hope my works don't get scratched before they get that lovely tough old-tempera surface.
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