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Old 26-09-07, 09:35 PM
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Default Let's talk framing

I have some framing issues, and I'm not talking aesthetic. Although, I'd like to hear about people's opinions on that too.

At this time, I use the traditional frames with an overhanging lip (forget the pro name for it). Since the painting is not cured by the time I frame it, the outer 1/8 to 1/4 inch of the panel tends to get scuffed and scraped. At first I didnt consider this a problem, since no one will see it. However, now I worry about it, as in the case of perhaps someone will want to reframe it and consider the panel to be damaged, even if reframing would hide it.

What does everyone else do for framing as a protective device? I am thinking I should line the inner edge with padding, but still not sure if that won't stick to the painting. I havent seen much contemporary ET framed in person, but some that I did see was in a floater frame with museum glass spaced overtop. (the practically invisible glass that didnt seem to interfere with the wonderful ET finish). Granted, that seems to be a good way to go but is of course more expensive and doesnt fit in with my last-minute way of doing things.

As for aesthetics, for the most part now, I'm using frames with a "Plein aire" profile, in either gold, warm silver or antique black/gold, as well as the occasional dark distressed type that IMO would go with an old Dutch work.
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Old 27-09-07, 02:21 AM
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JeffG, most good framers use a soft strip of felt that they run along the inside lip of the frame. I agree that it can stick to the painting and is really ugly when that happens. Although a scratched painting is not good either. It mostly sticks to oil paintings that take forever to dry completely. I usually just run some black electrical tape around the inside lip and haven't had any sticking at all. It is rubbery enough to protect the painting and the glue on the underside holds it in place. It can also be easily removed after the painting is dry (the strips of green felt are much more difficult to remove).
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Old 27-09-07, 05:03 AM
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Jeff,
I like to use a strip of felt on the inside rabbet of the frame or spacer that comes in contact with my painting. I get letter-size sheets of self-adhesive felt from Benchmark. It comes in several colors and uses a safe adhesive. This is a type of felt that's used in preparing museum mounts. It's not so nappy as the kind you might find in hobby or craft stores and less likely to leave fibers on the painting surface.
Another thing I've done to try to avoid frame marks on my paintings -- when I've actually thought ahead -- is to line off a 3/16 to 1/4" margin around my panel before starting the painting. Instead of painting out to the very edge, I'll more or less stop at the border. That blank edge gets covered by the frame and I don't care at all whether it gets scuffed up.
Dennis

Last edited by Dennis H; 27-09-07 at 04:18 PM.
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Old 27-09-07, 05:10 PM
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Jeff,
For what it's worth, lately I've been rounding the edges of my paintings with a router and painting all the way to the edge. When it's time to frame, I glue the painting onto a wider board, painted white, so there is about a 3 inch space all around the painting. I use 1/4 inch thick spacers so the board appears to be "floating" on the background. The frame itself is natural wood, which I attach to the background piece. It makes a nice presentation, though it does tend to have a modern look which you may not want...
Hope this helps.
Phil
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Old 01-10-07, 04:18 PM
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Thanks very much for all those suggestions, everybody.

While I will try the padding from now on, I think I am seriously going to look into floating panel/frames for my upcoming work. What I would love to do is to come up with a single (or limited) style of frame(s) that I can always use for all my work, so I don't have to think about frames.

I also think the subject of framing styles and techniques for ET, with a survey among ET artists would make a good article or resource for the ET society newsletter. I may look into doing this too, but if anyone else wants to give it a go, feel free.
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Old 01-10-07, 05:44 PM
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I typically float my paintings on a mat backing under glass with spacers. It simplifies things, but involves using a mat. Another technique I've experimented with is a sink mount without a mat. Instead of having a rabbet grove overhang, the frame edge is flush to the panel.
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Old 02-10-07, 07:14 PM
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I have found this very suitable for my purposes.



I no longer use glass but if you wish the glass can be sandwiched between the inner moulding and the frame.
The frame is attached to the inner moulding with a number of screw eyes and screws.

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Old 03-10-07, 04:03 AM
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I've tried an icon painting style where the frame is effectively built into the picture by building up the edge and gessoing the lot. I have done one round painting in this way and painted over the edge. It looks good. It does mean the planning for the painting has to be a bit more meticulous since it can't be recut though.
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Old 04-10-07, 07:02 AM
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This stuff work very well and does not stick to the painting at all... I used it for mine.

http://www.dickblick.com/zz173/26/

Best,
Jason.
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Old 10-10-07, 07:47 PM
sabine sabine is offline
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hi!

Aren't your framed paintings very heavy? Especially when they're glued to still another panel?

I like the floating effect, but I'm scared my paintings would get so heavy that no wall would be strong enough to support them!
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