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Old 09-02-08, 04:50 AM
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Question The best brush?

My favourites for working in oil were always Grumbacher Renoir and Gainsborough...

I've started working with a daniel smith kolinsky sable brush size 2 for tempera and am about to order a few more brushes to add to my collection of one. (Long overdue i know, but at I don't expect to wear through as many as I did with each oil painting.)

I'm considering a size 12 sable filbert as recommended in this forum, but what would you recommend for someone setting out in egg tempera? I would really appreciate hearing what everyone considers to be their favorite (or must have) brush? (including sizes and brand?)

cheers, jp
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Old 09-02-08, 06:16 AM
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The first time I picked one up I fell in love with Winsor and Newton Series 7 brushes. They are practically all I use. They stay pointed no matter what. The standard type is great for tempera. The miniatures have shorter hairs that give them the stiffness necessary to stand up to oil. Size 2 are the workhorses

Last edited by DLH; 09-02-08 at 06:18 AM.
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Old 09-02-08, 07:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DLH View Post
The first time I picked one up I fell in love with Winsor and Newton Series 7 brushes. They are practically all I use. They stay pointed no matter what. The standard type is great for tempera. The miniatures have shorter hairs that give them the stiffness necessary to stand up to oil. Size 2 are the workhorses
Your painting is very strong, but I couldn't see which medium you use on your web page. Is it a combination?

just found this in another part of the forum. This was from a conversation between Phil and Rob:

Quote:
I use Kolinsky sable and like yourself my brushes wear down rapidly duing the course of about two paintings. I use ABS brushes and find that they do not loose their point as they wear. A No. 3 brush will gradually convert itself into a 00 and still have quite a bit of life left in them.
All I do is keep replacing the No 3!!



I think the real problem is that as tempera painters we are regularly squeezing out the paint between our fingers or whatever method and at the same time removing a hair or two.
ABS do give some hints on brush care on their web site.
http://www.absbrushes.com/hintsandtips.html
And here I was thining these brushes could last a lifetime. I'd wear through a dozen with an oil painting or two. So that's still pretty good. I better stock up if i'm going to working half a dozen or so at once...

I think the art supply store here tends to stock only student/craft grade brushes, but I should check again. I've always had to order my brushes away...

I discovered the gainsborough the one and only time I made it to Pearl Paint on a school trip. It was heaven to me... it was the feeling I got in art supply shops as a little girl that made me want to be an artist in the first place. Stocking up in pearl paint was a high point.. a low point was the time I actually was so desperate for brushes that I tried to make one from my own hair. It didn't work...

Would still love to hear what other people are using and recommend...

Which company does everyone think makes the best kolinsky sable? I Just looked up the price for a one inch flat from daniel smith, and for that price I want to know I'm making the right investment. (Please tell me they last for much longer than a no. 3 round!) Are there more economical ones that work just as well... although I understand the difference good brushes can make.

I've never really taken to the winsor and newton that I've tried with oil... maybe because it was only student grade that I had easy access to. will have to check this series out when I have a chance.

update: was searching for more info on brushes, and just realized I missed the part about ABS. I've never heard of them before.. will have to see who carries them. (Yes I have sleep to catch up on. just a little excited about placing my brush order. my realgesso panels are on their way. yay!) curious though if ink ruins brushes, what do people work with who use indian ink underpaintings? I thought I'd try ink, silverpoint and tempera itself and see what I was happiest with... but how can you do a good underpainting if you have to use throw-away brushes? just wondering...

http://www.paintdoodles.com/artstuff/rncobrush.htm just found a product review for ABS... and more information on the company and products here:
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/brush3a.html

Last edited by jpohl; 10-02-08 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 10-02-08, 07:05 PM
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Oh dear........ABS brushes..........Rosemary and her husband split up some years ago and ABS ceased to exist......Rosemary started a new company........
For many, many years I have sworn by the brushes I use....ABS until the crunch...then Rosemary Brushes....OK Rosemary is a 'friend' and I have found no better brush........the 'big' names....well I've found they shed so many hairs......I can really recommend
http://www.rosemaryandco.com

her new company.........and if you do order by all means mention my name............
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Old 10-02-08, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobM View Post
Oh dear........ABS brushes..........Rosemary and her husband split up some years ago and ABS ceased to exist......Rosemary started a new company........
For many, many years I have sworn by the brushes I use....ABS until the crunch...then Rosemary Brushes....OK Rosemary is a 'friend' and I have found no better brush........the 'big' names....well I've found they shed so many hairs......I can really recommend
http://www.rosemaryandco.com

her new company.........and if you do order by all means mention my name............

i already did send an email request for shipping information (when i should have been catching up on sleep) I remember not having a good reaction to a winsor and newton kolinsky years ago, but perhaps I didn't use it for the intended purposes at the time... The daniel smith higher end i like, but haven't really worked it hard yet, and Rosemary's appear to be half the price... except for the filbert. Have you used a one inch kolinsky flat or sable?

That would be 193 dollars from daniel smith, and just a little less than a 100 from Rosemary, which may mean I can afford one a little sooner... if it's a good idea. maybe a sable will do? Jeff even recommended a synthetic. I also read some where that someone liked to use cat tongue (although I couldn't seem to find the post a second time) and noticed that Rosemary makes these among others. I know it's a matter of personal preference and style, but would love any feedback. The rake looks interesting but wonder if it would be too stylized, or useful... I have a feeling I'll try a few of each from both suppliers and see how things work out as I develop more of a sense of how to handle the paint...) My husband seems to think shipping from both places is about the same to Canada for light packages ...

thank you again. jp




p.s. do you prefer the long or short handled? I wondered if the long handled might be a bit better weighted, and it is my instict to go with these... again this is a personal thing. I know how my husband loves to write with big clunky fountain pens (maybe a lot of men do) but I prefer something very slim and light.. more like a brush.

I told Rosemary I thought she must be a genius... (especially after my one attempt at making a brush, but I didn't mention that. )

Last edited by jpohl; 10-02-08 at 08:32 PM.
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Old 10-02-08, 08:17 PM
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Rosemary does ship all over the world and her brushes are relatively inexpensive (I think you will also get them VAT free....less 17.5%...plus postage).....I will only use sable for my temperas.......I have never gone beyond the 3/4 inch brush......................if you are really interested then drop Rosemary an e-mail and ask her advice........mention that Rob Milliken has made the recommendation.....personally.....I will always use a service where I know I will get an honest answer....my garage ain't cheap but he's a friend of mine and I know that the work to be carried out will be necessary and not just to make a quick buck!!..............
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Old 11-02-08, 03:08 AM
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thanks again... I can't wait to try them out, and if I ever do make it to England and get over the guilt of leaving my toddlers for a couple of weeks I'll have to stock up... it's strange i hadn't discovered her before now if she's been doing this for 25 years.
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Old 11-02-08, 04:56 PM
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I worked mostly with the Winsor and Newton Series 7 brushes in egg tempera. Now I work in oils though I still rely mostly on Kolinsky sable rounds with a clean point and good spring. The brush I'm very impressed with is the Escoda Kolinsky sable round, series 2410. These are long handle though I'm sure they make the same in a short handle brush. Actually it's the Escoda Kolinsky -Tajmyr Sable 1212 which is said to form a point like no other, a point so fine that it cannot be seen with the naked eye. In Canada you can order them from Curry's.
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Old 11-02-08, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John View Post
I worked mostly with the Winsor and Newton Series 7 brushes in egg tempera. Now I work in oils though I still rely mostly on Kolinsky sable rounds with a clean point and good spring. The brush I'm very impressed with is the Escoda Kolinsky sable round, series 2410. These are long handle though I'm sure they make the same in a short handle brush. Actually it's the Escoda Kolinsky -Tajmyr Sable 1212 which is said to form a point like no other, a point so fine that it cannot be seen with the naked eye. In Canada you can order them from Curry's.
I have a feeling I'm going to have fun experimenting with a lot of different brushes. It's a weakness. I could go through brushes the way some women collect shoes. Thank you for sharing your trade secret... I'll have to try one...

just emailed Rosemary, and hope to hear back soon.
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Old 12-02-08, 03:30 AM
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I've found I really like Raphael Kolinsky sable rounds (sizes 2 through 6).
They hold up very well for me, maintaining a point and springiness for quite some time.
Dennis
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