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Old 24-07-05, 07:56 AM
otto otto is offline
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Default Casein vs, Egg Tempera

This has probably been put to rest before, but have any of you used casein enough to compare it to egg tempera? The ready- made alternative of the tubed casein colors make them very tempting over the prep work of the tempera. Cleaning the mulling plate between colors, etc cuts into my rare painting time, however I'm willing to do it if egg tempera possesses qualities the casein does not. I've used both paints in the past, but would like a "second opinion". Thanks
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Old 25-07-05, 12:26 AM
turlogh turlogh is offline
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Default Re: Casein vs, Egg Tempera

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Originally Posted by otto
This has probably been put to rest before, but have any of you used casein enough to compare it to egg tempera? The ready- made alternative of the tubed casein colors make them very tempting over the prep work of the tempera. Cleaning the mulling plate between colors, etc cuts into my rare painting time, however I'm willing to do it if egg tempera possesses qualities the casein does not. I've used both paints in the past, but would like a "second opinion". Thanks
I haven't used casein and will not attempt to compare it to ET. I would just like to point out that it isn't strictly necessary to mull most colors one gets from pigment suppliers. Simply shaking with water will generally do. So ET doesn't have to be all that time-consuming to prepare.
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Old 25-07-05, 06:31 AM
otto otto is offline
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Default Shaking Pigments....

Hey David,
Thanks as always for the quick response. I know you've used egg/oil emulsions: would you just stir the emulsion into the pigment that you shook together with water? I assume that's enough for the pigment and binder to come together? I guess I was (overly) concerned that wouldn't make an intimate enough mixture. Your opinion is much appreciated.
otto
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Old 25-07-05, 08:36 PM
turlogh turlogh is offline
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Default Re: Shaking Pigments....

Quote:
Originally Posted by otto
I know you've used egg/oil emulsions: would you just stir the emulsion into the pigment that you shook together with water? I assume that's enough for the pigment and binder to come together? I guess I was (overly) concerned that wouldn't make an intimate enough mixture.
My usual emulsion recipe is 3 parts egg yolk, 2 parts black oil, 1.5 parts water. This is an oil in water type emulsion (i.e., tiny blobs of oil suspended in an aqueous liquid). With this kind of emulsion, I've had no problems simply mixing the medium with a paste of pigment and water using a palette knife, just like plain egg tempera.
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Old 04-08-05, 07:28 PM
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I had never have given casein much serious thought. While in commercial art, I used it as a highlighter on pen and inks, and watercolor. I never developed an affinity to casein's texture. ET seems so richer to me,

I have a Van Day Truex casein painting. Uncle Van was an influential designer, and a teacher, by trade. He did many ink washes of mostly European architectural scenes. The painting I have is uncharacteristic for him, in that it is colored. It is a powerful allegorical scene, full if private messages. The painting has been spray sealed with some kind of glaze.

There it is, a casein painting that is a joy to me. Under the right hand, this chalky medium, handled with panache, can result in a strong piece of artwork.

Vince
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Old 14-11-05, 07:32 PM
odyssic
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There are also sennelier egg temperas in a tube.

Steven
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Old 14-11-05, 10:39 PM
odyssic
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I'm also wondering which would be better in the long run for getting broad fields of color, as in mandala painting.

I'm also considering the traditional glue size/ pigment recipe, but am a little hesitant about contending with not only the dry pigments but also the hot plate to keep the glue fluid.

Thanks!

Steven
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