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Old 21-02-09, 08:45 PM
shokan shokan is offline
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Default agate?

On one site describing the technique of egg tempera painting, a short mention is made of burnishing the completed work with agate to achieve brilliance. Can anyone elaborate on this? Is it a stone that I can buy, a powder? And, is there a more detailed description somewhere?

Thanks.
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Old 22-02-09, 04:53 AM
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Agate stone shaped, highly polished and set into handles are typically used to burnish water gilding to a high shine.



Sinopia http://sinopia.com sells several in different shapes in the gilding section of their website.

http://www.sinopia.com/index.asp?Pag...S&Category=113 scroll down.
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Old 22-02-09, 11:00 AM
shokan shokan is offline
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Thanks for the link.
The quote I referred to is this: "After the tempera painting is complete it can be burnished (polished) with agate to add depth and brilliance and to increase transparency, or it can be varnished to look like an oil painting."
I have seen references to gold leaf burnishing with agate and its use as the base for tempera painting but, as in this quote, the burnishing is used on a painting without gold leaf. I am interested in seeing examples by anyone who does this on the whole painting.

Last edited by shokan; 22-02-09 at 11:06 AM.
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Old 22-02-09, 10:54 PM
shokan shokan is offline
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I've also found this bit:
" Adding oil for instance in no more than a 1:1 ratio with the egg yolk by volume will produce a water soluble medium with many of the color effects of oil paint, although it cannot be painted thickly."

What are the characteristics of this mixture? Can someone point me to a more detailed discussion of this and maybe see samples of someone using it?

Thanks.
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Old 23-02-09, 01:51 PM
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Shokan,
You might try Koo Schadler's book, though I believe she does her underpainting in ET and glazes the final coats in oil, a little different method than you describe.
It seems to me we had a discussion about this a year or two ago. You might try a search.
Good luck,
Phil
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Old 23-02-09, 02:58 PM
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Default egg/oil tempera

dear shokan,

over the yearsi have used an extra addition of a drying oil mixed with my tempera medium, sometimes at the beginning of the development of a painting, sometimes in the later stages. the oil most often recommended is simply linseed oil, which will work fine. i have also used thickened linseed oil, or walnut oil, or safflower oil, which is actually my favorite. part of the reason is that it is substantially less expensive than walnut oil, but it shares the attribute of being non-yellowing, and has a much lighter consistency than linseed oil. it seems to me to go well with the character of tempera painting.

the technique for mixing it up is simply to add a few drops, or whatever amount you choose to use, to your egg yolk, and then mix it thouroughly with a spoon or some other implement before adding the water, then a vigorous shaking completes the mixing. usually the oil goes into suspension and stays there, but if it separates, more shaking does the trick.

the paint handles differently with the extra oil content, in that the paint layers are less likely to lift from subsequent overpainting, even done just a minute later. it also gives you a timespan in which the paint layer can be moved slightly with a smudging finger to create a blended patch of color.

if you'd like a demonstration, you can go to www.jimyarbrough.wordpress.com, where i use both straight tempera and oil and egg tempera juxtaposed for different effects. any of the posts about asha and the nebula will do.

good luck,
jim
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  #7  
Old 26-02-09, 07:08 PM
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I need add some information at the experienced word of Jim.
The mix of egg tempera and oil is one traditional Renaissance (Italy) recipe.
This is an evolution of the pure Cennini's recipe and the main purpose is to obtain a more flexible and time-resistant layer of painting.

The ratio from one to half to one to one yolk - oil don't set change in the way of painting, you will use the same tecnique as pure yolk.

In addition in other traditional recipes you can mix yolk, oil and gum (Chio's mastic is the best) to improve a layer flexible and insoluble. This will be a good ground to overpainting with pure oil glazing.

This recipes can be quite complex too, the imagination of the painter are remarkable. In modern times some quite simple recipes was related by Giorgio De Chirico and Giovanni Secco-Suardo (restorer).

This is a very good topic to investigate.
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Old 26-02-09, 07:25 PM
shokan shokan is offline
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Yes, I will be researching this. Thankyou. The book by Koo Schadler I think will be a good start.
CMunnisso, you mean Chio Mastic is an oil, correct? Why is it better than others for an egg/oil base for oil painting?

Thanks

(I am glad I found this site )
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Old 26-02-09, 08:01 PM
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The Mastic is the resin (gum) of the "Pistachia Lentiscus" from the island of Chio (Greece), is insoluble in water.
To use it must be melted into alcool or turpetine, but you easily find it ready to use with the name of "Mastic Varnish" in a shop.
Melting the mastic in boiling alcool or turpetine is a quite dangerous work, and if you don't know exactly how to operate is better avoid to burn the studio.

This resin is bright, transparent and flexible, better than others, but is quite expensive.
And is very good to chew, the italian "masticare" (from greek "mastika") means "to chew".
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Old 26-02-09, 08:11 PM
shokan shokan is offline
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"avoid to burn the studio"

I have to get the studio first!

OK, thanks very much for your help. I will find out all the things I need to know.
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