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  #11  
Old 07-09-09, 01:39 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Try a drop or so of alcohol in the paint. I know it reduces surface tension -- makes water-unfriendly pigments easier to grind -- and I bet it would make paint spread more smoothly as well. I have used rubbing alcohol; I think some have used a bit of wine or spirits.

And it won't turn your egg temperas to soap.
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  #12  
Old 07-09-09, 08:39 PM
Anna Varvara Anna Varvara is offline
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Well,i searched in my files and i found an egg tempera recipe which contains rubbing alcohol but i didn't know what its purpose is because my teacher said this ingredient is optional.Do you think it will work with ink?
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  #13  
Old 07-09-09, 09:01 PM
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KHart KHart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessandra Kelley View Post
Try a drop or so of alcohol in the paint. I know it reduces surface tension -- makes water-unfriendly pigments easier to grind -- and I bet it would make paint spread more smoothly as well. I have used rubbing alcohol; I think some have used a bit of wine or spirits.

And it won't turn your egg temperas to soap.
Alessandra .... you've got it wrong. very wrong. I'm not talking great globs of soap, for goodness sake, so the paint does not turn to soap. The egg tempera does not turn to soap. Don't know what kind of advertising agencies you worked for but the work I did was not created to be temporary and I do take offense at the way you simply dismissed my recommendation - and the sarcasm is not really helpful, either. By the way, I can't imagine alcohol would mix with egg very well unless you are after eggnog. Again, one or two drops in the water is all it takes... Of, course, it's possible I'm painting with bubble bath and don't even notice the difference.
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  #14  
Old 09-09-09, 09:47 AM
Anna Varvara Anna Varvara is offline
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Hmm,i will do some tests with ink/egg tempera and dishwashing soap and then ink/egg tempera with alcohol.I'm so curious really...the sugar method isn't very effiicient.
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  #15  
Old 09-09-09, 02:21 PM
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paintrman paintrman is offline
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Anna,

Now, this is going to seem a little off topic but it's not. Over the years, I have pretty much switched from buying powdered pigments and then grinding them myself into a paste with water to using dispersions (pure pigment pre-mixed with liquid). I noticed last week that some of my bottles are drying out. I called the company that sold me the dispersions and asked about adding more liquid to them. This sounds like a no-brainer but it's not! I have lost so many jars of pigment to mold and I am not going to add water if they will end up growing a layer of mold.

So, I called Guerra Paint to ask about adding liquid and the woman that answered said that I could use a tiny amount of their dispersion liquid and the rest purified water of some kind. She said that the dispersion liquid would inhibit mold and of course keep the pigment in dispersion but that I shouldn't add too much because it is mostly.............(wait for it)......soap!!!!

Hope this helps.
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  #16  
Old 09-09-09, 03:18 PM
Alessandra Kelley Alessandra Kelley is offline
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Wow, when I'm wrong I'm really, really wrong. KHart, I apologise for casting aspersions on your profession. Most of the people I knew into advertising and design were still students, so maybe not shining examples of best practices. Also, I'm sorry because I really didn't mean to have a sarcastic tone. I write more forcefully than I should, sometimes.

I had actually wondered about some of those pre-ground pigments because their texture was so oddly gloopy. That they're dispersed in soap clears up that mystery.

I'm probably too fussy about paint ingredients. I worry about adding extraneous things to paint because I heard too many stories about people who added stuff to their paint and messed up their art's long-term survival -- sometimes obviously wrong things, like olive oil, but also sometimes things that the art establishment of the time told them was a good idea, like megilp. Is soap dispersion really harmless in pigments meant for tempera? If so, it would be a tolerable way to prevent mold without harsh chemicals and a good way to get paint to adhere to slick surfaces. I can't recommend it but only because I've never tried it.
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  #17  
Old 16-10-09, 01:03 AM
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I have done quite a few reverse painted egg tempera onto glass and have had very few problems. I first thoroughly cleaned the glass with detergent and then with acetone. Although I didn't normally use oil in the egg tempera I think it does help with adhesion of the first layer. I think it is also important to let the first layer dry properly. Without the gesso to absorb the water it will remain fragile for a long while. For the same reason you can't really apply lots of glazing layers rapidly. I adopted a very hard edged graphic style in order to cut down the reworking of the surface - pretty much a line drawing with in fill colouring. When it is all thoroughly dry then I applied gesso to the whole thing (remember it is reverse painted) and voila I had a hard protective coat on both sides. The results are very charming and perfectly stable (for about 5 years now) and worth having ago at.
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  #18  
Old 07-02-10, 12:59 PM
Anna Varvara Anna Varvara is offline
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Sorry for late answer!

Well,jeff thank you a lot,your piece of advice is helpful for me!I didn't know the gesso can be applied on glass...initially i thought it it recommended for wood painting.So did you use the gesso as varnish,for finishing?I understand i have to be more patient with the painting,not to do as much as i can in a single day(concerning layers applying).I have a really nice model,i will try to show you the colored exemplary.
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  #19  
Old 12-04-10, 05:51 PM
narimane
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Exclamation romanian icons

Hello,
I a new in this forum and I saw your post about glass icons painting. It is true that the glass icon technique origins from Transylvania. But there is no information on the web about how to learn. The reason is simple : the technique is practised in Romanian monasteries and has never been taught outside. For the first time in the world however (as far as I know) there is a training course available. The teacher is a romanian woman who formerly was a nun in a romanian monastery and now teaches in the South of France. She also teaches in English during the summer.
It is unique in the world because the secret of glass icon confection has never stepped out of monasteries.

You will be able to find any information on the following website :
www.romanian-icons.com

Kind regards,
Narimane

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anna Varvara View Post
Well, thank you for the welcome!!

for paintrman: I forgot to say,in my last attempt I didn't use emulsion on the whole surface(just in some places)...I have just put the tempera on a glass and I think this was my mistake.Now I want to use it.So,about the ink,I will try mixing it with egg-oil emulsion...maybe 1:1 will do.
I was thinking at painting on wood panel but i don't know the technique.I have only learned to paint icons on glass in school and i have already the materials so this is why i'm still trying.I'm not at all experimented in wood method,and i find it kinda difficult to paint on copper .

for Alessandra:Yes it's called hinterglasmalerei.If you search on wikipedia in English you will find reverse glass painting.There says "This style of painting is found in traditional Romanian icons originating from Transylvania".....and Transylvania is a region of my country.
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