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  #21  
Old 10-05-10, 07:58 PM
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EllenT EllenT is offline
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VK,
As you know from experience, the mixed technique or the mische technique or the mixed method is fairly complex until you get the hang of some of the basic principles. Even then, as you also probably know, its likely that you will throw away more than you will save, at least at the beginning.

Regarding your instructions, I don't have any corrections since the specifics are different enough from my own experience but the principles remain sound. If you are curious, you can check out my blog where I have posted a bunch of information on the mixed technique, plus some visuals on the progressive steps.
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  #22  
Old 10-05-10, 10:40 PM
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(Ramesh Vyaghrapuri)
 
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Originally Posted by EllenT View Post
VK,
Regarding your instructions, I don't have any corrections since the specifics are different enough from my own experience but the principles remain sound. If you are curious, you can check out my blog where I have posted a bunch of information on the mixed technique, plus some visuals on the progressive steps.
Didn't realise that blog was yours - I have visited it several times before :-) I like your work and like the information there as well. Thanks.
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  #23  
Old 11-05-10, 07:37 AM
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VK,
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  #24  
Old 11-05-10, 11:51 AM
artistcb artistcb is offline
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Sorry for the confusion, I will split out the statements more clearly:
Thanks Ramesh , I believe I am understanding it now.

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As an aside, ..... if you are going to do an oil imprimatura before the first egg layer, you can start with a panel that has been primed using acrylics...
I think I'll be sticking with more traditional grounds. I've already prepared my panels and you should see them! I have to say, and I'm not trying to brag but I can't help it (hehe), they turned out amazingly! They are so smooth and beautiful with no pin holes or imperfections and are as smooth as ivory. I thought that is pretty good for being the first time I've ever made them. But, before I take all the credit, it is more due to me following the directions than my craftsmanship ha ha! FYI I used Gamblin Traditional Grounds and let it sit for the full 24 hours before cooking it. I also kept the temperature finely controlled with a candy thermometer and added water as it evaporated during the heating process.

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2. In the step where you are adding the white tempera, you cannot lift any red paints. So, the only way to sculpt is by adding white (just clarifying. this is not a problem).
If one really got in trouble at this point could a little of the red be lifted using turps and say a small paintbrush? Just wondering....hopefully I won't have that problem.

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All this talk about this technique makes me want to get back to this.. :-)
You absolutely should! It just seems there are so few people doing this method. Actually that is one of the things I found intriguing about it.
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  #25  
Old 11-05-10, 12:09 PM
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When I used damar+stand+turps -- I always had to wait for 5 days atleast. Either I was shortchanged (maybe they used less damar) or I couldn't get enough of the medium out.
I am going to throw my 2 cents worth in here and it may not even be worth that, ha ha, but one thing I did learn (not on Brigid's site but on the other site I previously mentioned) was to use a high quality damar. By this, I took it to mean one that it was made with a larger percentage of damar crystals in it. She recommended against brands like Windsor and Newton for this particular purpose. I bought what was available here at my local art store, which was Sennelier, and I believe it is 30% but would have to go look again to be sure. One could just make their own at the percentage they wanted but I have too much to figure out right now without adding that into the mix!
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  #26  
Old 11-05-10, 06:13 PM
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(Ramesh Vyaghrapuri)
 
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Originally Posted by artistcb View Post
If one really got in trouble at this point could a little of the red be lifted using turps and say a small paintbrush? Just wondering....hopefully I won't have that problem.
It is possible and the behavior depends on the amount and kind of medium used (for example, damar comes off better with solvents). I have never done this intentionally ;-P

This kind of lifting appears different from lifting while the glaze is wet so I will suggest you practice this on a separate panel before seeing how it works on your artwork.
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  #27  
Old 14-05-10, 12:35 PM
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I always used only egg yolk + water but thinned quite a bit (almost 1:4) for the spraying part. I basically thinned it enough till my spray bottle produced a nice spray.

Another tip: leave you egg tempera layer out in the sun -- it cures faster for some reason.
I've put on the spray (2 coats with 1 hour dry time in between) and I am wondering how long it takes to dry before I can put on the first oil layer? I've let it dry overnight but it still feels like it could be lifting a bit when I test it by touch. It looks really nice and has a nice sheen to it. Hopefully that is right.

We have had a lot of rain and the humidity was at 67% when I sprayed it. I think it is going to be sunny today so I will definitely let it sit in the sun a bit. What about dry heat? Has anyone ever tried to place it in the path of, but not too close to a parabolic (radiant) heater to speed drying time?

I also have a dehumidifier that I could place in a small closet if that would be helpful in my drying processes. Unfortunately we are in rainy season!

thank you
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  #28  
Old 14-05-10, 12:55 PM
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artistcb,
From my experience, sunlight changes the chemistry of the egg. So it is not heat, per se, it is sunlight. Just found a reference to confirm that.
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  #29  
Old 14-05-10, 02:23 PM
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Yes, I've heard its the UV light in particular. I wonder if anyone's ever used a sunlamp to cure an ET.
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  #30  
Old 14-05-10, 02:37 PM
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Yes, I've heard its the UV light in particular. I wonder if anyone's ever used a sunlamp to cure an ET.
Brilliant! Or hopefully brilliant! I've got a tanning bed so I think I will try it out and see what happens. Wish me luck I need some help with all this humidity and lack of sunshine..........

Update:
Although I am thinking more of "drying" I believe, than "curing"...two different things. The tanning bed rays didn't seem to do much but then again, how could one really tell? It feels more dry to touch
than it did before so I am going to go ahead and put on the first glaze and let that sit for the day. I am unfamiliar with how egg tempera should feel, look etc. so I am looking at this as one big experiment.

Last edited by artistcb; 14-05-10 at 04:40 PM. Reason: Update
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